March Book Club Pick!

My friend Kari and I started a book club in January 2021 so we could encourage each other to read more books this year.

In January we read American Dirt and it was GOOD!

Now for February … we read The Light We Lost by Jill Santopolo.

I have to say, this book was NOT my favorite for a LOT of reasons. Without spoiling the book … it was frustrating! The main character in the book is Lucy who has fallen in love with Gabe, but later makes decisions that lead her in a different direction, but throughout the book she is constantly battling in her brain and comaparing two men. IT IS FRUSTRATING! The chapters are quick and easy to read, so that was nice, but it just seemed to go on and on and on. The ending, to me, was very predictable and a let down. I have questions and kind of want answers … but at the same time I don’t need them or, honestly, really don’t want them answered because I honestly don’t care and just want to move on. Haha!

If you loved this book, sorry for the bad review, but I just didn’t love it!

This was Reese Witherspoon’s comment on the book:

“This love story between Lucy & Gabe spans decades and continents as two star-crossed lovers try to return to each other…Will they ever meet again? This book kept me up at night, turning the pages to find out, and the ending did not disappoint.”

Sorry, Reese … it was a disappointment and I am sad you steered me in this direction with your raving review. I forgive you though and will give you another chance! 😉 Haha!

SOOOOO without further ado …

Our March book club pick is *hopefully* a good GOOD one!

We have chosen The Vanishing Half: A Novel by Brit Bennett

Named a BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR by The New York TimesThe Washington PostTime, NPR, Entertainment Weekly, Vulture, USA TodayGQVanity Fair, Harper’s BazaarGlamour, and Bustle

Praise for The Vanishing Half
“[Bennett’s] second [book], The Vanishing Half, more than lives up to her early promise. . . more expansive yet also deeper, a multi-generational family saga that tackles prickly issues of racial identity and bigotry and conveys the corrosive effects of secrets and dissembling. It’s also a great read that will transport you out of your current circumstances, whatever they are. . . Like The Mothers, this novel keeps you turning pages not just to find out what happens.” —NPR 

“Bennett’s gorgeously written second novel, an ambitious meditation on race and identity, considers the divergent fates of twin sisters, born in the Jim Crow South, after one decides to pass for white. Bennett balances the literary demands of dynamic characterization with the historical and social realities of her subject matter.”The New York Times

If you would like to read with us, head over to our Facebook Page and join the group! We just started reading it with our goal to finish by the end of the month.

Happy reading!

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